Creatives in Profile: Interview with Henningham Family Press

HFP Logo.jpg

It seems old hat to say that mainstream publishing has been facing an existential crisis in recent years. As profit margins thin, the go-to response from the biggest publishing houses has been to retreat from investing in new ideas, and to banking on “sure things” – which, as Julian Barnes has noted, essentially amounts to republishing copies (or imitations) of commercially successful novels. Indeed, the mainstream publishing industry has become so risk averse and sold on the idea that committees of sales and marketing gurus that millions are now spent on orange-headed celebrity books whose pie charts and spreadsheets appeared to augur well but are in the bargain buckets shortly after they first appear.

Within this risk averse culture, new outlets for unique and creative expression, through art, writing, and fine book making are increasingly rare. Those that do exist must therefore be cherished.

Henningham Family Press (HFP) is the collaborative art and writing of David and Ping Henningham. Both Artists and Authors, HFP combines writing and art through fine art printmaking, bookbinding and performance. Based in Dalston, London, the pair primarily work with National and Regional Cultural Institutions and civil society groups, and are always looking for new institutions, such as museums, libraries and publishers to collaborate with.

Collections that have acquired HFP’s work include the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Tate, Saison Poetry Library (Royal Festival Hall), UCL, Chelsea College of Art and UCLA. They have exhibited/performed at/in Christie’s Auction House (Multiplied), Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, the British Library, BBC Radio Theatre (BBC Radio 3 ‘The Verb’), Dundee Contemporary Arts, The Whitechapel Gallery, Black Rat Gallery, London Word Festival, Berlin, Ghent, Oslo, Bergen, Indiana and Virginia. David has also taught bookbinding at Central St. Martins College of Art and Design.

It is an honour to bring you this detailed interview…

INTERVIEWER

Tell us about yourselves, your background and ethos.

HENNINGHAM FAMILY PRESS (HFP)

We are David and Ping. We met at St Martins art school. We started Henningham Family Press in 2006 to bring together our writing, printing, binding and performance and make them presentable.

INTERVIEWER

Who inspires you?

HFP

Inspiration for our work tends to come from history, the natural world, museum collections, but in terms of surviving financially and explaining ourselves to others we’ve often turned to William Morris, Bauhaus, Woolf’s Hogarth Press days, David Bomberg, Edward Wadsworth and the Danielson Famile among many others.

INTERVIEWER

Can you tell us a bit about HFP – how was it borne into existence?

HFP

Ping did a presentation about my sculpture at the Slade, she did Art History at UCL, and my tutor Ed Allington spotted we should probably work together. We returned to this idea when we both developed an allergy to supporting ourselves with part-time office jobs; a common wasting condition that still goes unrecognised, despite the weight of evidence.

INTERVIEWER

 A number of your successes so far – hinted at in your site biography – beg to be elucidated further, such as your ‘Monday School’ project of 2011, which saw you write the only Bible commentary to feature a fight with Slavoj Zizek in a bookshop. Has the press evolved as you expected since you first set it up?

HFP

Ha! No. We thought we’d make four titles a year and sell them through bookshops. We didn’t reckon with the labyrinthine structure of publishing. We didn’t like having a gallery either, so we evolved a process of publishing books through and for choreographed live events, “performance publishing”. We’ve even got a couple of reputable magazines to use our phrase like it’s a real thing.

INTERVIEWER

What does the average day look like to you?

HFP

That’s a mythical beast! We used to work side by side on writing, printing, binding, but now with the kids we swap midday. When they are old enough they will do all the work while we sip martinis.

INTERVIEWER

What do you think a publishing house or printing press should be for? Why are they important?

HFP

It’s probably a best case scenario for the private ownership of the means of production. I associate it with freedom of speech. Books, I hope, will preserve the best our times have to offer, allow a conversation with the living, create some beautiful artefacts. I only wish adult minimum standards were as high as Childrens’ for book production. Adults would read a book made of gravy to save a pound. Kids demand quality.

INTERVIEWER

In Negotiating with the Dead, Margaret Atwood writes that “Language is not morally neutral because the human brain is not neutral in its desires. Neither is the dog brain. Neither is the bird brain: crows hate owls. We like some things and dislike others, we approve of some things and disapprove of others. Such is the nature of being an organism” – what art and writing do you approve of? Do you see your own work as having a political element to it at all?

HFP

Very much so. Multiples are suited to democratic and egalitarian distribution. Our writing reflects our economic and political opinions. But we totally overestimate our ability to change things when we begin a project, but even in the end it feels good to make sense of things a bit and create solidarity. Having said that, a handful of people have said to us “your book changed my life”.

So what we approve of coming out of our heads is relatively focused. Cosmopolitan, egalitarian, sceptical about rationalism, fascinated with how we organise our lives arbitrarily. We always take an original angle on subjects, rigorous, experimental in form, or what would be the point? But we tolerate a wide spectrum going in. Most of what I won’t read is because of it’s sloppy and cynical standards.

INTERVIEWER

Obviously, the rise of the internet has seen a big culture shift in the way we communicate. What role do you see traditional presses playing in this new “digital era”?

HFP

I’ve been asked this a lot. In a nutshell I’d say it’s proven to be the case that digital technology has made printing and binding far more affordable, accessible, cleaner and made distribution easier. It’s a boom in digital and physical publishing with a side effect of stimulating the finer bindings like we do. Now people read across platforms, they can see more clearly what a book is, and more people seek out a fine binding.

INTERVIEWER

The future of literature; of writing – and indeed the future of publishing – are all frequently discussed at great lengths. What are your thoughts on current  where are we heading?

INTERVIEWER

Well, what would you say to the industry? If you were a doctor? Look we can operate, but… It’s too slow, too many internal blockages. There’s been a move towards the idea of experimentation in literature, that goes with a centennial reappraisal of modernist writers, both of which I “approve” of to use Atwood’s earlier word, but I’m not sure anything with depth has happened there yet. But smart people are on it. I think agents and publishers will encourage their established writers to write with more formal invention, and the obsession with debut novels will lead to calls for established authors to write a sort of “second debut”. More explicitly mid career prizes will emerge to cater for the growing number of debut authors to enter.

But perhaps this return to modernism misses the point. The rupture in 1910 wasn’t just the playing with typography, but the idea that so many people have something to say, not just a few authors who, although often very good, do those standard readings followed by death-by-a-thousand-autographs. Modern writing showed that different kinds of perception exist, so there’s no point having an experimental writing scene populated by wealthy people from a single school, which does not reinvent the process of publishing and distributing many more authors to readers who read more widely. Manuscripts get missed and the quality sometimes suffers. A positive example of where publishing can go is Penned In The Margins, a great example, and if you go to Free Verse in Conway Hall, this sept, you’ll see that the poetry scene hasn’t got the same problems as the agent-fed industry. The fact that so many readers also write is a symmetry we should expect thanks to education, automation and digital. Really good novels will continue to get published, but I’ll stick my neck out and say that increasingly over the next two years people in the industry will worry about the bandwidth and creativity of the big publishing houses more. Some may even call it a crisis.

d-henningham

HFP in action at the Central Hall of Artists, Moscow. Image via Henningham Family Press

 

INTERVIEWER

What are some of the main challenges you face?

HFP

Same as everyone. Brexit, with a side order of interminable recession, served on a bed of expensive higher education that is seen as a product to be sold. It all makes it harder to make a living, funds shows and sell books to people.

INTERVIEWER

How would you define creativity?

HFP

A bucket of water balanced atop the doorway to routine

INTERVIEWER

You’ve recently been commissioned by The British Council to make a major public art contribution at The Central Hall of Artists, Moscow – could you tell us a little more about this project, and how you find more artistic-led projects such as this complement the other creative aspects of your press, including performance and writing?

HFP

We did the British council commission with BA Illustration students from the British higher school of art and design. It was a combination of teaching them, creating, screenprinting, binding publishing all on site. They built a temporary workshop in the UK guest of honour pavilion. We were part of a delegation with Jonathan Coe, Jim Crace, Paul Mason, Jenny Broom, Emma Healey, Tom Gould, lots of fine and inspiring people. We like to make things like this en educational experience for us and the students. Performance adds process, structure and duration.

ping-henningham-mosco

Preparing to Print: HFP in action in Moscow. Image via Henningham Family Press.

INTERVIEWER

What’s next for HFP after your project in Moscow? What should we look out for?

HFP

We just finished making a deluxe edition of The New Concrete for Victoria Bean and Chris McCabe, which will go to America. Some novels by me are mounting an escape attempt from their drawer, and we have a choral version of An Unknown Soldier in development for the stage.

INTERVIEWER

Could you write us a story in six words?

HFP

After impact, Helen could see wifi.

INTERVIEWER

What are your 5 – 10 top tips for aspiring writers and artists?

HFP

  1. If someone asks “can you do this?” Say yes. Find out how later if you can’t.
  2. If someone says “can you do that again and again and again…” You might eventually have to say no and get back to what motivates you.
  3. The world is very poorly organised and obsessed with money. Set your own criteria for success.
  4. Making space in the world for your work is different to the work itself. Make sure you keep energy and perspective in reserve to do good work.
  5. The artworld doesn’t really exist. You can gravitate towards other markets and other audiences and it’s still art.

 

To learn more about Henningham Family Press, visit their website, and find out about their latest shows via www.maximumwage.uk

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One thought on “Creatives in Profile: Interview with Henningham Family Press

  1. Pingback: Nothing In The Rulebook Interview | Henningham Family Press

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